How To Use Flickr To Promote Your Photography Business

4 04 2011

[So you’re wondering how to use the many online tools to market your business. This week I’ve decided to start a new How To series that does exactly that. We’ll take a look at many of the different online social sites –things you can do for little to no cost – and show you different ways to put them into your marketing mix.]

Flickr is one of the hottest online social tools that allows you to share your photographs. Flickr was started back in the beginning of 2004 by two game designers who wanted an easy way to share photos that featured their gaming project, and quickly blossomed into something much more. Yahoo purchased Flickr for $35 million in 2005, and the rest as they say is history.

How To Use Flickr To Promote Your Photography Business

So if you are a photographer, chances are you have used Flickr in some manner. You may have an account. You may have uploaded a few images. You may be active. But in the land of “free”, how can you use Flickr to attract clients to your photography business?

The secret lies in thinking of Flickr as an extension of your business. Its not just a casual site where you can put up a few images of your clients, share it with them, and allow them to send their images all over to friends and family – before they’ve paid you for your services. Instead, you have to look at Flickr as another sales tool – without treating it like a sales tool. After all, the worst thing you can do is get to salesy on any social networking platform.

Start With Your Flickr Account

How is your Flickr account set up? Is it based on a cute nickname (i.e. photogirl123)? Or is it based on your company name?

When you think of Flickr as an extension of your business, it’s easy to see how you should set up your account. Title it by your business, personal or website name – which ever makes the most sense depending on the way you market your business. Once your name is established, build your profile and your groups to support your branding and your business.
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What’s The Purpose Of Entering A Photo Contest?

17 03 2011

Sometimes it seems like it takes more effort than it’s worth. Not only do you have to keep up with your regular business and client work, but then you have to add in creating specialty images to enter into photo contests too? Is it really worth it?

Yes.

A photo contest ultimately does three things for you.

1. It boosts your confidence. Nothing can put a smile on your face more than being recognized by your peers. When they recognize your photographic talent, you know you’ve accomplished quite a bit in your career.

2. It educates you. Taking photographs for clients is completely different than taking photographs for awards. You look at things differently, put new perspectives on your subject matter, and learn more about the true art of photography.

3. It proves your expertise. When you market your photography, your client judges you based on your images and your marketing materials. When you add “award winning” in, it changes the dynamics. Your client instantly knows you’ve been recognized outside of the typical business world, and others appreciate what you do as well.

Win a few awards, and your business can easily become more professional, more saleable – which means you can charge more for what you do.

If you enter a local contest, you can list “award winner”.

If you enter an international contest, you can list “international award winner”.

With just a couple of wins behind you, you could quickly improve your status by becoming an “International Award Winning Photographer”.

And you could win some pretty cool prizes along the way too.

Here’s a look at contests happening right now.

2nd Annual Great Outdoors Photo Contest 2011

Have a chance to show off what you can create in nature, and have a chance at winning a week long Polar Bear Adventure.

The Photo Contest

Browse through this blog to find a variety of contests and photography competitions from around the world. They have different categories – portrait, sport, travel, etc – so you should be able to find something corresponding to your interests.

31st Annual Spring Photography Contest

Winning photographs will be published in the November 2011 issue of Photographer’s Forum Magazine, and exhibited at Brooks Institute Gallery. Read the rest of this entry »





10 Ways To Help Break Photographer’s Block

2 03 2011

As a writer, I understand writers block very well. When you sit down and start at the computer, wondering what your first sentence should be, nothing can be more frustrating. The same can happen with photography. What do you do when your facing a new portrait session, and you can’t think of a single thing new to do with your client? Let’s look at 10 ways to help you break photographer’s block.

1. Just shoot. Instead of sitting around waiting for an idea to hit you, spend the next 30 minutes shooting. Shoot at least 30 images in that 30 minutes, and look for things around you that can build into the photograph. Digital Photography image source Noel Zia Lee

2. Start surfing. Head over to Flickr and browse through other images. With millions of photographs online, you’re sure to find something that sparks your interest. Use that as your model for shooting. Read the rest of this entry »





10 of the Best YouTube Channels For Photographers

14 01 2011

Do you enjoy heading over to YouTube for a break – choose a video and get inspired for the day? You’re not alone. With millions of hours watched every day, there really is something for everyone. I’ve been doing a lot of research on YouTube lately, and in the process found some wonderful channels that you have to check out as a photographer. Know of any more? Leave a comment below – I’d love to find other professional YouTube channels just for photographers.

AJ Wood
Everything Adobe – whether you are looking for tutorials on Lightroom, Photoshop, or even Dreamweaver, these videos will give you hours of ideas.

Bert Stephani
Bert has been adding videos for a number of years; start with his Confessions of a Photographer series for some quick tips on photographing. Read the rest of this entry »





Photographers, Still Having Trouble Posing Your Clients?

13 10 2010

You meet your client in the middle of a beautiful park. There are several types of trees, amazing displays of flowers, a bridge over a stream … and hundreds of people taking advantage of the nice day.

You freeze on the spot. What are you going to do with your client? How are you going to avoid all of these people? And how are you going to give them a portrait experience they are willing to pay for? And possibly refer their friends to you as well?

It all comes down to knowing how to pose your client. When you know how to pose them, it doesn’t matter what the situation is. You’ll know how to jump in, find the right, look, and direct your clients into the perfect pose that they’ll love, and buy.
Learn more about Posing The Easy Way Here>>





10 Ways To Use Flickr To Market Your Photography Business

10 10 2010

1. Go Pro. If you haven’t set up a pro account, just do it. At just $24.95 per year, its one of the most economical ways of creating your portfolio online. With a Pro account, you get unlimited photo uploads at up to 20 MB per photo, unlimited storage, unlimited bandwidth, statistics and the ability to post to up to 60 group pools.

2. Convert to a vanity URL that matches your business. From your profile, you have the ability to edit the URL that will take people to your Flickr stream. While you may have started with something simple like “Joe’s Photo Stream”, remember this is always about your business.  Flickr.com/VirtualPhotographyStudio is a lot easier to share and sounds more professional than Flickr.com/JoesPics.

3. Thumbnails matter too. Every set or collection you create is represented by a thumbnail. Your thumbnail is the first introduction people have to your photography – make sure its engaging and has the inspiration to make someone want to click. Remember you also have the ability to select which image will be the cover of your set or collection. Don’t go with the first one loaded – be selective and choose the one that will showcase your work the best.

4. Tagging is important. For many photographers, tagging is an afterthought. But tagging is the one thing that can help you market better than your competition – if you know how to do it right. Start by tagging based on the image itself – location, description, content, people in the photos, etc. Then spend some time finding out what people are searching for, and tag using those terms as well. If you haven’t spent some time using the Flickr search function, spend some time searching yourself to learn the ins and outs of the system.

flickr search

5. Join groups. Flickr is an amazing social site if you use it right. Just like Facebook, you can build your own profile, join groups, and share with friends on a regular basis. Make sure you’re logging into your Flickr account just as often as Facebook or Twitter. The more you share, the more you’ll gain.

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Using Social Media Coupons To Bring In More Business

2 10 2010

By now I’m sure you’ve heard all about Groupon – we did a post here back in December on using Groupon to bring in a ton of clients within one 24 hour period.

But it doesn’t have to be Groupon – there are many other social sites popping up, giving you an opportunity to showcase what you do and bring in new clients too.

Living Social
Living Social is connected to a variety of sites, including Facebook, and offers deals in a similar manner as Groupon. They have many major cities throughout the U.S., and a few in Europe as well.

Pricing Your Photography: How To Set Your Prices To Build A Six Figure Business.

Ever Save
Ever Save goes beyond local services, and offers a variety of products too. If the service isn’t local, head online, put in your code, and buy your deal at the discounted price. Their deals also stretch longer than a 24 period, meaning you don’t have to check in daily like Groupon or Living Social.
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