Photographers Are You Blocking The Print Feature On Facebook?

17 11 2010

Do you know how easy it is for your friends in Facebook to print out your photographs at a local big box store such as Walmart or Target?

I just read an interesting blog post over at A Photo Editor on printing your Facebook photos, and wanted to bring the conversation over here as well.

I love social sites and think they are a great way of marketing your business. But you do have to think twice before heading down that path with your images, and the way you post them for your friends to see.

In Facebook, one of the best ways to grow is to take your photos, put them into a new album on your page, then tag them with your clients name. They will now feed into their news streams as well, and can potentially bring you in business down the road. Friends flock together and have similar tastes and requirements, so it’s a perfect way of marketing. But you have to keep three things in mind.

1. Be properly compensated BEFORE you release them on Facebook

2. Keep your image size small – a 300 pixel, 72 DPI print isn’t going to print well no matter where your client takes it.

3. Understand your rights to your images greatly diminish when you release them to any online social site.

And now once again, Facebook is making things a little easier for the average member, and a little more difficult for the photographer.

If you’ve tagged a client in a photograph, your client now has access to printing that photo at any of the big box locations – Walmart, Target, Walgreens, Shutterfly. With just a couple of clicks, they can see their albums and any of their friends albums in the application, select an image and hit print. It will be ready and delivered to them in no time. Unless you opt out of this feature.

Tagging is good for showcasing, but gives them access to your photos through the Facebook print feature at many labs, including Walmart, Walgreens, etc.

Visit these pages, and under the application click the Block Application button. You will then opt out of this application, which means your clients will not see your name if they try to use this application.

Did we miss any? Any other photo apps out there that we need to block as photographers?

Helping photographers with their photography business.





7 Tips To Create A Highly Marketable Social Media Portrait Session

4 11 2010

I first introduced the concept of a social media package over a year ago when I introduced Neil Creek, a photographer who created MeetHeads as a way of introducing people to his portrait studio through the use of social portraits.

Since then I’ve been watching the trends with social media portrait packages, and taking in how photographers are using them. There is definitely a right and wrong way to introducing social media to your clients. Yet as most photographers today continue to hand over the digital files, and your clients are using them in social media anyway, why not create a package just for them? Not sure how? Follow these tips.

1. Think outside the box with your sessions. How can you get creative, take images from a variety of angles, and give your clients many opportunities for sharing images online? Talk with your client about likes/interests. Incorporate some of their favorite hobbies into the session as well.

2. Put the focus on social media. Facebook is the rage right now, so use it. Market your portrait session as a great way to share images with the online world. You can even provide perfectly cropped photographs, sized specifically for different social sites. Social Media Training

3. Introduce props and special options. How about a glamour session – work with a local hair/makeup artist who can spend an hour before hand glamorizing your client. Seasonal portraits can also be fun – fall colors, winter snow, and summer on the beach.

4. Don’t hand over a raw disk; make sure your packaging says wow as well.
For a low cost, you can buy blank CD/DVD holders, and customize the front packaging. Then screen print your CD/DVD with your branding, or print one off with a CD label maker for and even more customized look.

5. Charge appropriately. If you’re handing over one file of a quick 20 minute session, $99 may be okay. But if you’re doing an hour or more shoot of an entire family, and spending time customizing the images, you can charge several hundred dollars or more. They get the files, and they will print large images if they desire to do so. Part of your fee is for the entertainment factor of the session as well. If they have fun, feel comfortable with you, and like the results, several hundred dollars is more than reasonable.

6. Create social media days. Especially if you are creating a specific background, or on location at a local park, limit your social media sessions. If you shoot one a month, 4 sessions at a time, people will quickly learn there is a high demand for your service. Create a waiting list, and announce a month or two at a time. If you make each month in a different location, it will quickly become a limited event, and you’ll have more than enough business to fill each session.

7. Add something that says WOW. You’ve read about Moo cards here quite a bit – I love them. So why not add a mosaic frame filled with Moo cards as one of your options. If you are photographing a family, you’ll come up with a variety of images of individuals as well as the group. Create a pack of mini-cards, throw in a frame, and along with the CD/DVD of the images, you’ll have your clients talking in no time.

And if you want to try out Moo today, I’ve got a special that will allow you to do so with a 10% discount. If you’re new to Moo, type in RZUMYP at check out, and you’ll get 10% off your entire order. It’s only through September 30, 2010, so get going on your first order.





How To Use Facebook To Promote Your Photography Business

5 05 2010

Let me ask you a question. Are you using Facebook for your business?

If you are like most people I speak with, you would answer like this:

“I have a profile and I have around 50 friends, mostly personal friends.”

or

“I’ve set up a page for my business, but I really don’t know what to do with it.”

Facebook only starts to work for your business if you commit to using it for business, and work to grow it. Correctly. Because of Facebook’s strong Terms and Policies, making sure you do things the right with is hugely important. The last thing you want is to build up a big following, and be shut down because you aren’t using it correctly.

facebooklogo

First, learn the difference between Facebook’s three tools: Profiles, Pages and Groups.

Facebook Profiles
When you first sign up with Facebook, you’ll start with a profile. Your profile is all about you; not your business, your product, or your service. Your profile is created by using your real first and last name. Then you fill your profile with your personal information. Add as much or as little as you like. But remember your profile is your window to the world. If someone is deciding on whether to do business with you, this helps break the ice and gives the opportunity to find something in common.

Facebook Page
A Facebook Page, also called a Fan Page, is for businesses, brands, organizations, or celebrity/public figure. Your page is all about business, and is the one place you can actively promote what Read the rest of this entry »





Photography and Facebook – A Great Combination

11 03 2008

Has your photography business hit a slump? Are your sales down from last year? Or, are you ready to move to the next level. Enter the Facebook social arena. Facebook and photography can exist with great complimentary connections. Here is a fan page that we put together on Facebook to introduce one of our services. – Facebook sample page – take a look and if you are not a member, register at no cost and explore this next generation of marketing.